EU

Arnoldas Pranckevičius: what the Crimea crisis means for Europe

By Tanguy Séné | 15 April 2014

A few weeks ago, Crimea was annexed by Russia. It followed a regional referendum closely watched by Russian troops on Ukrainian territory. Arnoldas Pranckevičius, External policies adviser of European Parliament President Martin Schultz, went to Ukraine many times on special missions before and during the crisis. In this interview, he sheds light on what it represents for the Europeans. 

Outcomes of the December Defence Council

By Matteo Ricci | 17 January 2014

On the 19th and 20th of December 2013, for the first time since 2008, a European Council dedicated a significant part of its time to defence. This article analyses the decisions made at the Council meeting and aims to determine their impact on the future of the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP).

The CSDP and NATO: friends, competitors or both?

By Matteo Ricci | 17 January 2014

    One of the main points of contention of the European Union’s Common Security and Defence Policy is the relationship of the CSDP with the existing NATO framework. This article aims to present the current status of this complex relationship and the problems affecting their co-existence.     

The Challenges for Europe’s Defence Council

By Matteo Ricci | 12 December 2013

On the 19th and 20th of December the first European Council in six years dedicated to the theme of defence will take place in Brussels. This article looks at the objectives of the Council meeting and analyses the challenges facing Member States, which will have to choose before closer integration, or a steep decline in Europe’s defence capabilities.

Interview with MEP Leonidas Donskis

By Claudia Louati | 13 October 2013

MEP Leonidas Donskis is a Lithuanian philosopher, political commentator and one of the leading human rights and civil liberties advocates at the European Parliament. A member of the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (ALDE), he takes part in the European Parliament Committee on Development and Subcommittee on Human Rights, as well as in the Delegation to the Euronest Parliamentary Assembly. He kindly accepted to share with us his views on the Lithuanian Presidency, its ambitions and priorities.

Realizing the euro’s full potential is up to us

By Andreas Sowa | 9 May 2013

Will the common currency still be around in 2020? Ridicule me in ten years, but I am certain that it will be. It is not very common these days to defend the euro; and it is even less common to praise it as one of the main, positive, achievements of the European integration project. This however, is what this article sets out to do. Voices defying the status quo in reporting and public opinion are needed to prevent the onset of a negative self-fulfilling prophecy. The constant reporting on and prognosis of a collapse of the Eurozone will lead to just that: the end of the common currency. Differentiated analysis of the euro’s weaknesses is in order; hysterical blabbering about the euro’s apparently imminent end is not.

Forgotten advantages of the European Union – the European civil society

By Christina Forsbach | 9 May 2013

“Don’t ask what Europe can do for you but ask what you can do for Europe!” In his speech given in February, the German president Gauck makes good use of this reference to Kennedy’s well-known inaugural address. Beyond resistance towards sometimes petty political decision-making, we need a stronger common civil society. Promising projects are under way.

A day in Europe

By Piera Sciama | 9 May 2013

From the instant you wake up and turn the light on to the minute you decide to download a movie online before going to bed, the EU invisible hand has been influencing the most varied aspects of your day- to- day life. A few illustrative examples were selected to illustrate the rather positive effects of EU action in order to bring up a reflexion on its achievements and its importance in citizens’ lives.

Labour Mobility in Europe in Times of Crisis

By Elena Magriñá Sánchez | 9 May 2013

With a youth unemployment rate of 56% in Spain, 58% in Greece and over 30% in Italy and Portugal, young Europeans are taking advantage of the free movement of people and labour, which has become a symbol for European integration. Similarly, other countries such as Germany, which has a youth unemployment rate of only 8% and a shortage of qualified workers, benefits from it as well. This fundamental freedom constitutes one of the most important rights that the EU guarantees to its citizens.

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