100th anniversary of the 1917 Russian Revolutions: No narrative – no commemoration?

By Inga Chelyadina | 4 November 2017

One hundred years later, what does Russia think about the events that took place in February and October 1917? Is there a shared attitude towards such figures as Nicholas II as Vladimir Lenin?  The narrative of the overthrow of the monarchy, which paved the way for the communist regime after having executed the Imperial family remains to be identified. Most importantly, the absence of a single narrative carried out through education, culture, government positions, and the absence of celebrations might be caused by the fear of the government to commemorate any events that led to changes in the political regime.

„Siebenbürgen, Land des Segens“: Memories of the Germans of Transylvania

By Balázs Gyimesi | 4 November 2017

„Siebenbürgen, Land des Segens“, in English „Transylvania, land of blessings“, is a Transylvanian Saxon folk song also known as the “Siebenbürgenlied” (Transylvania-song) from 1856 , which romanticises the region, traditionally inhabited by Germans, Hungarians and Romanians, as a “green cradle of a colourful flock of peoples”.  The German inhabitants of Transylvania in a broader sense, including the region of Banat, belong to two groups: Swabians and Saxons. The former settled in the region of Banat around Temeschwar (Timișoara), while the latter settled in the region of Transylvania proper in and around Hermannstadt (Sibiu), Schäßburg (Sighișoara), Kronstadt (Brașov) and Bistritz (Bistrița).

A Korean Pilgrimage to the Russian Far East

By Svetlana Kim | 4 November 2017

The Russian Far East sounds as if it is in a remote distance outside of our daily perceptions. And yet, it is close to the hearts of those whose collective memory is rooted there: The Koryo-saram, or the half-a-million Russianized minority of ethnic Koreans living in the countries of the former Soviet Union.

The diplomatic notes of the Donetsk People’s Republic

By Andreas Pacher | 4 November 2017

In emulating conventional inter-state practices, the self-proclaimed Donetsk People’s Republic regularly sends notes diplomatiques to its fellow governments in South Ossetia, Abkhazia and other contested territories of the post-Soviet space. Their communication reveals the historical events they cherish as their own version of collective memory – and their misguided interpretation thereof.

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